The Master Plan

The master plan, funnily enough, was not to stop making things and never blog again. It was to make the garden more manageable so it would be less work and I would have more time for sewing!

A particularly labour intensive business is the weeding of the vegetable beds where seeds from the grass and general weed seeds get thrown over the edges by the lawn mower so, given the relative success of the ‘new’ flower garden, which is surrounded by box hedging and where I put down weed fleece and bark around the outside edges (where roses etc grow), I decided to switch out a grass path for stone one and edge the beds with box. Around Christmas, we changed our stairs/landing carpet so I made a path using that (laid over the rubble left over from building works last year) and we bought the box small from a nursery (which is by far the cheapest way to buy them) and by the time I’d accomplished that seemingly straightforward feat, I’d got tennis elbow :(

I think I agree with Fiona that the best thing to with the garden is use it as a personal birdwatching area!

Anyway, I ploughed on and everything got greener and greener…

…and we finished up the leeks and started on the over-wintered broad beans and onions and cabbages and I planted the summer seeds and planted them out and even the flowers started coming out to see if the frosts are finally gone for the year…

…and then (just as I had strategically positioned the bean sticks and was about to beat a retreat back to the Makery) Mr RH decided we really needed to dismantle the green house, which has been buffeted and warped and twisted and had havoc generally wreaked on it by storms for more Winters than I can remember and has been cobbled back together as best we could each Spring. And (not before time!) he decided to start helping.

And so began the next phase of dismantling it and sieving bits safety glass from the stones where the greenhouse was to reclaim them for the path. I was actually amazed at how much of the stone we had so, laborious though it was, it was definitely worth doing.

With only some minor dismantling of the frame left, this brings us to the question of replacing the greenhouse. Whether to put a new (stronger one) one in roughly the same place, very firmly concreted into ground, or whether to put one further into the garden where it might be more sheltered and reclaim it’s old place as garden.

I was up for trying a polytunnel but Mr RH has a grander vision of something very decorative. Hopefully, we will manage to find something in between that is structurally sound but doesn’t break the bank.

In the meantime, I think we can safely say that the master plan has failed – in the short term.

But I’m remaining cautiously optimistic that all this will end up being time and labour saving in the longer term. It’s not a position that I am giving very close scrutiny because I think it’s only that kind of cautious optimism that is saving us from living in a massive tangle of brambles and nettles and overgrowness (which was pretty much what we inherited when we came here and you couldn’t actually walk around the house or see out through some of the windows).

I hope your sewing and knitting and making is fairing better than mine :)

Janine @ Rainbow Hare

I have inked this post with Soma at Whims and Fancies for May’s Wandering Camera

9 thoughts on “The Master Plan

  1. Kim Sharman says:

    You have a beautiful garden, Janine. You will have to write more posts showcasing it’s beauty. Love the pond and the ducks and the irises and the roses, and the……..! Oh, I do love the sound of a rather posh English greenhouse. =) I am rather liking your husband’s thoughts on this subject. I did smile at the photo of Fiona. I rather like to watch my husband working on ‘his’ garden, from a distance. Gardening is hard yakka. Good on you for wrestling with nature.

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  2. Megan says:

    Your photos are very pretty unfortunately no matter what I do the photos are obscuring the text. I guess google wants me to update to chrome. Pity because I won’t… Anyway the garden looks glorious and the cat photo is too cute. Enjoy the garden after all your hard work.

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    • Nanette says:

      I could’ve written this post……too hot through summer to weed, so they became a jungle, still are in places……I got dengue fever as the weather cooled so too unwell to garden, and now I’m trying to catch up, get the winter veggies in and make as well. Like you, I want to just enjoy it from the sideline. Your garden is beautiful, and I love the geese wandering majestically…..are they yours, or wild?

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  3. Sussexmouse ( Marion ) says:

    You can look forward to sitting down and having some well earned me time after gardening Your vintage caravan machine cover is very popular I keep seeing it on Instagram Marion x

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  4. Anonymous says:

    We have been trying to make our gardens maintenance free. Off to a late start again THIS year as we have more rainy days than sunny. Woke up this morning to see three frogs and a turtle on our pond island. First time that I know of that we have a turtle. I’ll get him out when I can to rehome him at the river. I’m pretty sure he wants fish dinners.
    xx, Carol

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  5. piecefulwendy says:

    Boy, that’s quite the project, but I’ll bet it will be worth it in the end! Just weeding our flowerbeds was exhausting (because we had let it go too long), but my flowers are so much happier. Not much sewing happening in this neck of the woods either. Maybe some later today.

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  6. Pam @Threading My Way says:

    All your hard work is paying off, Janine – all those wonderful flowers!! Your garden is beautiful. When you are on a roll, you just have to keep going. The sewing and crafting will still be there when you are ready.

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